Potentials for 2015

Having finished “My Year ‘In C'”, I will continue the unfolding of my adventures in sound in 2015 and beyooond! The new blog will be “Jude’s Soundlings (did you hear that?)”, and will be hosted here on WordPress. In the new blog I will continue my very basic and simple exploration of sounding the world/sounding my being/sounding health and healing through creative action. I aspire to stay freshly curious and naive in this exploration. I am no expert in anything, I have nothing to teach, but I love to play! If anything I say or do sparks some naive curiosity in you, please share it with me through comments and/ or emails and, of course, your own creative actions.

Here is a sampling of some potential actions for the coming year:

Jody Cassell and I will continue our work with movement and sound. I appreciate the support and encouragement we have received from ADF, Durham Arts Council CAPS program and all the participants in our classes. We will be finishing up our school residencies and adult studio classes through the BCBS/ADF grant in the Spring. We are also excited about a new affiliation with Leah Rutchick and her Durham-centric Activities meet-up group.

Trudie Kiliru and I are (finally) getting serious about collaborating on creative projects. Christmas Eve we began brainstorming for questions we want to explore in our art. We are interested in the evolution of consciousness, the healing of the childhood pain profile, and how to create stories in our art that are not locked into linear narrative nor defined by dramatic arc. Oh, yes, and also physics and sacred geometry. The spiral and the wave. Alrighty then, we got some stuff to work with- more on this adventure later. (The wait is over- we are exploring the idea of “home” and all the actions that go with that idea – “leaving, going, coming, longing for, where is it? ” We are so excited with such fertile ground.)

Two projects in the planning stages are more soundscapes for art exhibit openings and creating a long form free dance piece for a NIA class Patti Reiser is planning. I am working on a Halloween soundscape for Allie Mullin’s photography show next October.(Scary!!) I have indicated interest in creating soundscapes for NC artist’s Juditta Musette and Debra Wulliger in the coming year. I hope to work with Libby Lynn again. If you are a visual artist planning a show and interested in having an original soundscape inspired by your art, please contact me. Examples of soundscapes can be found at https://soundcloud.com/dejacusse/tracks. I am setting up a Bandcamp site where folks can download my work for a small fee. (Thank you for your support!)

I would dearly love the opportunity to diffuse a soundpainting through multiple speakers. I would like to be able to actually mix and move the parts in acoustic space. This is possible and I have most of the equipment to do it. This is coming, I know. After playing the Bass and Percussion version of “In C” I would love to play that piece in a club as part of an evening.

I am working on a soundscape dedicated to my brother, Paul, who died last month under very tragic circumstances. I am using sound and music to express all the confusion, sadness, regret, loss and hope that I am feeling and as a way for me to mourn his loss.

I am a loving, caring womanhuman (whuman?) and I want to act that way more frequently than I do. I can get quite righteous with people who (I feel) dismiss me, although I have done the same to others. So I will continue to be as open and willing as I can be in each moment. I really want to learn what in the world is my business- meaning that in the broadest terms, such as what is my concern, what talents do I have to offer this concern, etc. The mediated world distracts me with making all concerns my own. To feel so is to drown in despair and ineffectuality. Away from that world there is a field where we learn what we can really do, and it is usually less than we think. That has been my experience, many would call me part of the problem, apathetic, frightened (that one bares looking into), but I can see too much to continue participating in more than a cursory way. This is because I want to focus my energy on the future and creating a higher vibration on and within this planet, this Universe and beyond.

Thanks for reading! Please join me at “Jude’s Soundlings (did you hear that?“) next year.
Don’t be discouraged; be love!

Mixing it up

With all of our ADF classes completed for the Fall, attention can be focused in the studio. There are always abundant projects to be developed and finished. Finishing is getting a recording of a tune or soundscape that represents the piece as a “hard copy.” Since most of my Ableton Projects are works in progress with space available for others to chime in, it is possible that there will be multiple and very different versions over the lifetime of a piece. As with “In C”, the parts (clips and some animation) will be the same with each hearing, but how they weave together to create a whole and the fullness of that whole is subject to the Now and who else is in it. It is my hope that many of the soundings of my compostitions will be only in that moment in time, never to be heard again, while the core of the piece will always remain.

In order to get a hard copy, I put the voices together in my favorite room to play – my head. I am playing in that space like I never have before. Paying attention to which voice is where, how much space the voice takes up, and how it fits in or stands apart from the other voices. All of these considerations are to further the storyline of the piece of music. And listening through headphones is one experience of it, while listening through monitors is another. As I create the mix for headphones, the position and movement of the voices is a big priority. For example, there is a processed shaker sound during Phrygia: Hera’s Saga that feels as if it moves right through my head thanks to the panning effect on it. When this sound is played through monitors, there is a feeling of it moving up and out through the room, so the direction and distance the sound travels comes across quite different to me in each of these diffusion settings. I want to experiment with different ways of mixing with different priorities for these two modes of experiencing.

The mix for Phrygia: Hera’s Saga has gone through numerous transformations. I have a mix of the first two movements Waken and Move that I am very happy with. The voices blend when I want them to blend and stand apart when I want them to stand apart. The sound is full and the voices dance around in the mix, taking turns being up front. The last three movements The Chase, Catch the Shadow and Kundalini Joy have been more difficult to mold. I have a good recording and have spent hours sculpting the mix. While engaged in this process, I am consulting Bob Katz Mastering Audio and Mixerman’s Zen and the Art of Mixing. Both these guys have alot of mixing experience and they have very different approaches with lots of good info.

One of the techniques I was working with in The Chase was an abundance of reverb tail on two instruments, which I liked playing around with to obscure the attack on the fundamental tone. This type of sound is often refered to as “muddy” in the mixing world. I find it rather magical to have the entire soundscape awash in reverberant harmonic tones. As with most magical things, this needs to be used wisely and not excessively. I am bordering on excessive in this piece partly because I am using the reverb tails as a background wash for the main themes, AND the lead instruments are providing both the main theme and the harmonic wash. A plucked samisen and vibes are the lead instruments and they mirror at times and interact at times. This morning I used some EQ techniques suggested by Bob Katz. I used an EQ 8 on the strings because they are providing most of the background wash. I ended up using a spectrum to identify the main fundamental tones in my high end material (bells, tamborine, shaker) and then dipped these tones out of the plucked samisen. This seems to have worked in that I still have plenty of reverb wash, but it isn’t constantly overwhelming the spectrum. The high end parts were accelerating some harmonics in the main instruments, now they have there own space and the harmonics are backgrounded more.

I accidently discovered a commonly used mixing technique that mixes two different Ableton renderings of the same track, with slightly different animation, together in Audacity. What had sounded weak and tepid now has presence mixed this way. This is called “double tracking” and is a common practice when mixing tracks of vocals or guitar on band mixes. Part of the fun of my work is that I have alot of resources about mixing and mastering audio, and I have to figure out how to apply these concepts within the virtual realm in which I work.

Mixing Phrygia:Hera’s Saga down to a thirty minute hard copy took many weeks and required many breaks to rest my ears. This piece has a bright sound especially initially and, while I like this sound, I am aware that it can wear ears out especially through headphones. When I listened to the entire 29 minute piece, I hear a frequency movement that begins low mid range, then moves high and then ends with a growling, rumbling bass taking a main theme at the end. While I have a full recording that mixes the whole thing as one piece, I ended up putting the piece into two tracks on my Bandcamp site. I have this as an album, and I may add some other tracks I have been working on over the course of this year. The main thing is that this is for Sarah Sage and all that she gave to me. I am so thrilled that she has emerged from her medical trial by fire with so much strength. I am not surprised as I know very intimately the healing capacity of the great love she carries. My constant prayer is that she will allow herself that healing and not just look to her tribe and their experts for how to proceed on her path. This prayer is sent forth in the music that comes from remembrance.

Finishing Touches

So I am coming down to the home stretch of “My Year ‘In C'” and I want to end as I began with posting at least every week. I have no plans to play “In C” anywhere, but I will continue to play with the slices and songsets. Using the patterns of “In C” as little Lego blocks of sound and putting them together in different combinations has grown my compositional ear and my personal sound aesthetic. There are so many possibilities in the sonic world that is laid out in this piece of music. “In C” questions all the assumptions we have about being in tune and being in time when making music. When we loosen our grip on what we think things should sound like and pay attention instead to what we are hearing and what is emerging from our attempts to articulate that hearing, whole other worlds open up. Those are the worlds I want to continue exploring. I have so much appreciation for Terry Riley and “In C” for opening so many doors.

Opening and closing doors is THE metaphor for the year 2014. The Full Shanti played our last kirtan together on New Year’s Eve at the Raleigh Dances of Universal Peace. Sotar and I continued to play together until he left for Yogaville in September. So the door closes on our sweet kirtan band experience. The door opened for more soundscapes and composing through my work with Jody Cassell and ADF. Beginning with creating a dance piece for Rodger Belman’s summer ADF class to Moving Meditations and Embracing Health Through Movement to residencies in several local elementary schools, the twin vortexes of productivity and inspiration, coupled with the amazing networking skills of Jody Cassell, blew this door wide open. Two years after my official retirement I am no longer administering vocational evaluations for Person Industries. Door closed. Opportunities to perform soundscapes continued in 2014 with “Phrygia: Hera’s Saga” at The Makery for Allie Mullins photography exhibit in August and “Won Gone” performed at The Won Buddhist Temple bazaar in October. Several other artists have indicated interest in soundscapes, so this door is opening wider into that future.

Then a very large portal into the past, the year 1984 specifically, opened up. The Universe urged me to reconnect with people with whom I have shared great love and great creativity. And there are so many wonderful people, and two of them were predominant in my 2014 heart-breaking open. In the Spring, a woman I deeply love became ill and she was using Caring Bridge to communicate with her friends and family. Reading the journey she and her wife were taking through this heavy lesson opened my heart again to the memories of our time of loving, which was very powerful for me. I am so overjoyed that we have even the slightest of connection now. (Door open!) I am so grateful for the tremendous gift of love she gave me. She has come out the other side of her illness, and will be using her innate healing skills to deal with any future problems (that is my deepest desire for her.) Then a door closed in early November when my youngest brother, Paul, died. I am simply stunned and not believing that this has happened. I am looking for the lessons, questioning what it means to love, to be a family, what we come to believe about ourselves based on what we think other people feel about us. And once again I am reminded that I can help people, but I can’t save them. As much as I wanted to save him, as much as I think I should have been able to save him, I could not do so. I am paying attention to secrets and lies and how they can really damage self and others. And I am channeling grief into sound and music. This is a rough draft of a soundpainting called Keening.

I allow a stridency and hysteria that is looked down upon amongst my people. Listening brings discomfort and distance, laugh or cry wherever that discomfort takes you. The laugh means “I am not ready for this”. The cry means “i am letting this (come and) go”.

All finishings touch me.

A Podcast (of sorts)

So many projects right now and much work getting done. The last few weeks I have been up every morning between 4 am and 7 am working on new ideas for soundscapes. What I am hearing is very influenced by our study of Mozart’s String Quartet No. 22. A very fun piece that truly illustrates how a simple theme can be restructured in multiple relationships to itself to create a thing of beauty. The Divine WoW is leading to collaborations, collaborations falling apart, which leads to more collaborations. And the most beautiful thing is that I am inspired by these collaborations and not clinging to them. I get some impetus out of each and every one. And I continue to be endlessly available to myself in the studio.

As I was going through some files this week, I came across this recording I made of myself (there I am again!) playing a slice of “In C” in the Sun(Ra) Room. I loved this piece that begins with the dotted quarter swaying of Patterns 20 to 26 then travels up to and a bit beyond Pattern 35. The movement is from a holding back to pulled into a gallop, and then jump into the free flight of Pattern 35. I invite you to crank this up and let it carry you away as it does me every time I listen. It has the form of pleasure to my ear. As always I am very interested in what YOU are hearing.

I am calling this a podcast because I talk a little bit in the beginning.

Computer (mis) Adventures

I mentioned a few weeks ago that my computer locked me out. I took it to Intrex in Durham (where I bought the computer in 2009) and Tim, who is very friendly and knowledgable on many things including fixing computers, diagnosed and fixed the problem. He could not access my computer and had to make an image of the hard drive in order to save my documents and tunes. The image seems to be like a clone that is missing all the operating softwares. Then my hard drive was erased and all the standard operating software was reloaded so it was basically like new. Then the image of my hard drive was loaded as backup file on the computer.

Then came the reloading of the various softwares that are important to my sound work. Ableton, Audacity, a few VST plug-ins, Audio Converter, were immediate needs. When I went into Ableton and checked out project files, I discovered missing files and missing instruments. I took this as a redirect from the Universe to reaudition the ensemble voices for “In C.” So the Percussion Choir was reconfigured with fewer beat repeat instruments. I enjoyed the artifacts that the extra beats created, but decided to go for a cleaner sound since it is entirely percussion sounds except for the woodwind on the long tones. I will experiment with purely percussion at some point by dropping out the woodwind. Or put the beat repeat instruments in place of the woodwind to fill out the long tones. It was great to be back in the studio with the fresh perspective of a (sort of) new beginning.

When the computer is the space wherein creativity takes place, a malfunction of this nature can be daunting and a bit panicy feeling. I realize how fortunate I am to have other creative avenues that are NOT tied to a computer. Playing percussion and leading singing response during The Full Shanti kirtans keeps me grounded in basic rhythm making and helps me grow new neural pathways as I maintain the beat while singing different parts. Writing songs, playing marimba, ukelele, percussion and singing with Jody Cassell, Dancing Storyteller, keeps the creative juices flowing. Both of these sounding opportunities are wonderful collaborations in which I am honored and excited to take part.

I am aware of my dependence on the electro-magnetic field, quantum mechanics, and digital technology to express myself creatively. And I never want to lose sight of the fact that as long as I have a body I can listen and play with sounds.

Then, when the body is gone-
pure frequencies
till my wave function collapses once again.

First “In C” Attunement – April 2, 2014

Today has been an exciting day with many energetic boosts along the way. This morning, I started researching first person accounts of the 1964 premiere of “In C.” (I would love to get my eyes on a copy of Alfred Frankenstein’s review whose famous headline, “Music Like None Other on Earth,” is oft quoted in writings about “In C.”) I did come across one first person account from Leah Garchik’s column in SF Chronicle, May, 2009:

— One last thing about “In C”: Harpsichordist Margaret Fabrizio, who used to be on the faculty of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, reports that it was raining during the premiere performance of Terry Riley’s piece, and the roof of the old building leaked. “About 10 minutes into the piece, I had the distinct feeling that I was in a tropical rain forest. Seconds later, an umbrella went up. Then more, until the hall was filled with people sitting under their umbrellas. Unforgettable.”

I would think humidity would really add to the overwhelment people must have felt on that first hearing. I love this evocative recollection. And then there is the suggestion that Leah Garchik wrote more about “In C” in previous columns, so that lead needs to be followed up on.

And now, two days later, can YOU say, ‘Ask and it is given?’ I have in my possession the compete text of Alfred Frankenstein’s review of the program in which ‘In C’ premiered. I am ecstatic to this moment with this find. More on that later. Just noticing and appreciating the manifest.

Another ecstatic root of the moment is the first ‘In C’ attunement with Xopher Thurston and Susanne Romey on April 2. They were the perfect folks for this my first encounter with musicians who will play the score in real time on an instrument. This piece is a workout for musicians and instruments. Xopher and Susanne jumped right in as we played through the first seven patterns. I like to aim for Pattern 7 because it is an aural resting point and a wonderful illustration of accumulating lag in the piece. However, it is not a resting place for musicians because all the rests demand to be counted.

So we discussed how to count this pattern. In Ableton, the pattern is a loop, so I suggested that once you have counted in the first group of rests and played the 3 quick Cs, you could simply count 16 beats between interations. Xopher pointed out that counting in that way undermines the form of the phrase by placing the iterations on the one. In which case, why not just write the phrase as the three notes and 16 pulses of rest? Excellent point to ponder. Do these two different forms create two different feelings of Pattern 7, and, if so, is one more “correct” than the other?

One of the things I learned from this attunement is that we can collect questions like this and play with them. So as more players attend an attunement, we can get more voices in the conversation and use this interaction to explore them. For this reason, I have decided to schedule several attunements a month during this year. This will allow a community of musicians to engage with this experience however they want and take something from it and give something back. And all that is required is presence and openness and willingness to go where ‘In C’ takes us.

On a basic level, playing “In C” is a really fun way to practice riffs, runs, appeggios and modulations. So, if nothing else, playing this piece will sharpen all of our chops! Another thing I learned from the attunement is that I need to engage with this piece with my instrument, so I am working on vocalizing the patterns. This will help me in communicating with the instrument players and in being more sensitive to the challenges this piece presents.

Finally, do not forget April 15th @8 pm – Motorco Music Hall.

In C postcard

 

 

 

 

 

Row, row, row your boat!

Singing this on New Year’s Eve, we marveled at the profundity of a children’s song about this dream we call life. Thinking about that song now as I launch my boat on a year long voyage through Terry Riley’s mystical marvel of a composition, “In C.” Jim Kellough introduced me to “In C” and I felt a connection to the piece immediately: fifty-three melodic phrases played in sequence over an eighth note pulse. A little direction and ALOT of space. I love it! So The Idiosyncratic Beats of DeJacusse featuring Jude Casseday will spend the year playing and exploring this incredible sonic space in a variety of contexts with many collaborators

Why now?

2014 marks the 50th Anniversary of Terry Riley’s acclaimed musical work. The piece premiered on November 4, 1964 in San Francisco and was recognized even then as a landmark, revolutionary piece. Riley’s directions for playing “In C” are basic, and encourage a serious playfulness. An eighth note pulse grounds the musicians as they play through each phrase, usually staying within 2 – 3 phrases of each other. Since there is no downbeat, a single phrase can end up with multiple iterations over the pulse. There is a feeling of moving in and out of time with amazing counterpulses and otherworldly harmonics created whenever the piece is performed. No wonder San Francisco music writer Alfred Frankenstein called it “Music Like None Other On Earth.” Upon receiving performance permission and purchasing scores in September, 2014, I began selecting voices and creating clips for the 53 phrases of “In C” in Ableton Live digital audio workstation (DAW) software. Ableton Live is my music gymnasium/playground/laboratory. (I will devote some future posts to Ableton.) Once all the phrases were plugged-in and instruments chosen, I began to play with “In C.”

What is the intention of this exploration?

I am curious about how far we can deepen into this piece of music. It invites us to enter with ears wide-open into a sonic world. There are rooms in that world I want to explore. For example, the composer recommends that as the musicians play through the phrases, they stay within 2 to 3 patterns of each other. This approach creates a particular sonic movement that is intentional. I am intrigued with combining the phrases that are further apart. I have been playing with the phrases in various combinations ( i.e. all long tone phrases, all 1-2 note phrases) and the depth and variety of sound with just the Ableton instruments are amazing. A different song everytime!
The second thing I am intrigued with is what more can be heard when the Ableton renditions are diffused into acoustic spaces with other instruments. My plan is to perform “In C” at various venues with groupings of live musicians throughout 2014. The year long celebration culminates with a 12 hour happening of “In C” in the Fall of 2014. And I am very interested in how people will receive this work, especially when we do longer forms of it.

I hope that you all will come along on this journey. If you live in the Raleigh-Durham area, I hope you will come out for some performances. If you are a musician and would like to play the piece (no one has to commit to every performance or the whole 12 hour happening) or if you have an event happening that “In C” might be a part of, please contact me at dejacusse@gmail.com.
I am so excited to begin this journey!! I will update this blog at least weekly, so stay tuned.